Quote 27 Jul 63,818 notes
Which do you want: the pain of staying where you are, or the pain of growth?
— Judith Hanson Lasater  (via breanna-lynn)

(Source: alllways)

Video 26 Jun 5,838 notes

dynastylnoire:

sheenvelopesthenight:

sinidentidades:

Statement of Concern from Arizona Critical Ethnic Studies

The members of Arizona Critical Ethnic Studies are deeply concerned by a recent incident involving an Arizona State University (ASU) police officer and an ASU faculty member. We call for a swift and thorough investigation into this matter.

On the evening of May 21, 2014, Dr. Ersula Ore, a professor in the English department at ASU, was walking home from campus after teaching a summer course. Dr. Ore, who is African American, was stopped and questioned by a male ASU police officer patrolling the area in his vehicle. After a short exchange with the officer, a brief physical altercation ensued in which Dr. Ore, who was wearing a dress, was forced up against the officer’s car and then onto the ground, fully exposing portions of her lower body to the public. Eyewitness accounts of the incident, including video evidence, support Dr. Ore’s assertion that the officer did not clearly inform her regarding why she was being stopped or inform her of her rights, and engaged in excessive force during her detention. Despite these questionable circumstances, however, Dr. Ore has subsequently been charged with felony aggravated assault on the officer, among other charges.

We are troubled by the responses of the media, University, and ASU Police Department about this incident. Media versions have presented a sensationalized, one-sided story that differs substantially from Dr. Ore’s and eyewitness accounts. Officials at ASU, in response to questions about the incident and possible racial profiling, have sought to distance the University, stating that 1) because the incident occurred on a public street between parts of campus, it was technically “off campus,” so Dr. Ore was a private citizen; and 2) although they will comply with any investigation, there is no evidence of racial profiling. We find these responses insufficient. First, the officer involved was an ASU police officer and the University is responsible for the conduct of its employees, including its police force. Second, whether as a private citizen or as a member of the ASU community, Dr. Ore has the right to expect dignified and humane treatment by ASU’s police officers. ASU, as a public institution, has a responsibility to ensure this occurs. Third, ASU has not undertaken a thorough investigation into the matter, so how can officials claim that there is an absence of racial profiling? In a state and metropolitan region in which racial profiling has been proven to be widespread, the ASU administration’s lack of concern for the well-being of an ASU community member of color is unacceptable.

Given that the mission of the ASU Police Department is, “To enhance the quality of life by providing a safe and secure environment through professional and proactive law enforcement services in partnership with the University community,” this incident clearly warrants further inquiry from ASU.  We ask the ASU administration to conduct a comprehensive investigation into this matter as well as an audit on the conduct of its police force vis-à-vis racial profiling.  How can ASU ensure a safe, secure, and just environment for its faculty, students, and staff if it disclaims any responsibility for the actions of ASU police officers? The following questions should be starting points for its audit: In the ASU Police Department, what training is in place to ensure that its police officers are knowledgeable and well-trained to be in compliance with laws prohibiting racial profiling and excessive force? What monitoring systems exist to ensure accountability? How does the department respond to racial profiling complaints?

Dr. Ore, the ASU community, and the broader public deserve a full and just investigation into this incident.

Arizona Critical Ethnic Studies is a network of college and university educators and independent scholars throughout Arizona.

No black person is ever safe.

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

via ForteRiot.
Text 24 Jun 3 notes I wish some POC would stop pretending that we aren’t just as capable as whites of being anti-Black
Video 19 Jun 52,777 notes

whoatheretedward:

My trolling attempt backfired and we just talked about clothes shrinking in the wash…

Text 19 Jun 179,013 notes

fe-liscatus:

mamakarkat:

WHY ARE PEOPLE WITH PENISES GIVEN FREE CONDOMS WHEN THEY DON’T NEED TO HAVE SEX BUT PEOPLE WITH VAGINAS STILL HAVE TO PAY FOR THINGS LIKE PADS AND TAMPONS FOR SOMETHING THEY CAN’T STOP

wow,

amen sista

(Source: iiiarclight)

Photo 19 Jun 4,497 notes
Text 19 Jun 47,089 notes

nonelikerae:

Do you want to create an emotionally stable life together and adopt a dog or nah.

Video 19 Jun 11,728 notes
Video 2 Jun 15,325 notes

soyarturitollamamerey:

policymic:

The racist response to the Spelling Bee is further proof America isn’t ready to talk about minority success

On May 29, they became co-champions of an especially hard-fought Scripps National Spelling Bee.

In the past few years, the 89-year-old competition has seen a striking pattern in which Indian-American contestants have lifted the winner’s trophy eight consecutive times and in 13 of the past 17 outings. Their streak feeds into years of conversation around race, achievement and immigrant success — all tied to problematic notions of what it means to be “American.”

Read more | Follow policymic 

Just cuz white people are raising their kids to mediocrity (because that’s always been good enough for them to succeed), they’re suddenly mad at the world…

(Source: micdotcom)

Video 2 Jun 12,882 notes

cumaeansibyl:

misandry-mermaid:

This is how you feminist ally.

Transcript below:

Hey guy friends, read this (yeah it’s long):

So you’ve heard about the misogynist shooter at UCSB, and his public statements that he killed women (and guys he saw as having ‘unfair access’ to women’s bodies) because he felt like he deserved sex and attention from women, and felt entitled to revenge when the women around him understandably stayed the fuck away from his creepy self.

What he did was way more extreme than anything 99.99% of men will ever do, but our culture endorses his basic premise, and we’re the ones who should really be challenging that. This guy was steeped in a culture that told him it’s OK to get mad at women who turn you down, that girlfriends and sex partners are a reward you get for being a man the right way, and even when he started talking about murder, he didn’t really stand out until after people were dead.

You probably don’t know any future spree killers, but it’s statistically almost certain you know someone who has already or will commit rape and/or intimate partner abuse. And the thing about those guys, that we know from research is, they think they’re normal. That every other guy does the same stuff behind closed doors. Enough do that they’re not exactly wrong. And we strengthen that feeling whenever we stay quiet when someone says some sketchy shit. 

When you hear a co-worker talk about getting back with or back at an ex, remind him breakups are unilateral. Tell him it’s fine to be sad on his own time, but she’s made up her mind and he’s gotta move on. Ask him why he wants to be in a relationship with someone who doesn’t want to be around him anymore rather than try to find someone who does. 

When your cousin complains bitterly about women rejecting him even though he thinks he was nice, say ‘Dude, don’t try to make them owe you. Go find someone who LIKES you’ Maybe no one will like this guy, but that doesn’t change the rules, and he’s more likely to be likable if he gets that shit out of his head.

When you hear guys joke about forcing a woman to have sex, remember they might not be joking. Or they might be, but someone else in earshot might be relieved to hear other guys do it too. Don’t laugh. Say ‘dude, people are gonna think you’re a rapist’ and see what happens. Make it awkward. I’m not the best at this either but we all gotta try. 

When your female friends or girlfriend tell you some guy in your social circle creeps them out, stop inviting him to stuff. Offer to talk to the guy with or without mentioning them specifically. Things are already awkward, you’re just handing this dude back the awkward mess he’s already made. It’s ok for you to have ‘doesn’t creep out my other friends’ as a thing you require in a friend. 

Don’t make women do this shit alone. It may be hard for you, but women take WAY more heat from guys when they do these same things. We gotta get our asses off the sidelines.”

Bolded mine because that applies to pretty much all of these situations — it’s not the confrontation that makes it awkward, it’s already fucked. If you’re uncomfortable with what someone’s saying, you’re probably not the only one. And I totally get the impulse to let inappropriate comments slide because that means the awkwardness will be over faster (totally done it! we all have!), but if you do call it out you’re likely to make the other people around feel better too because thank God somebody said something, that was really weird.

We need more men encouraging each other to step up.


Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.